factory wholesale good quality Towing Strap TS10001 to Ghana Importers

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Our growth depends on the superior equipment ,exceptional talents and continuously strengthened technology forces for Lifting Belt Sling, , Cargo Buckles, , 75MM Ratchet Strap, , Any interest, remember to really feel cost-free to get hold of us. We have been wanting forward to forming profitable business enterprise relationships with new purchasers throughout the planet from the close to foreseeable future.
factory wholesale good quality Towing Strap TS10001 to Ghana Importers Detail:

Item NO.: TS10001
Size: 4’’ X 30’
Breaking Strength: 40,000lbs
Working Load Limited: 13,333lbs
Reinforced Loop Ends Protective Sleeves
MOQ: 500PCS

Remarks:
1) Never attempt to recover a vehicle without all the necessary equipment.
2) Only use equipment which is properly rated for the particular situation, if in doubt, don’t use it.
3) Never exceed the minimum breaking strength of the strap or working load limited of shackles.


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 Towing Strap TS10001 to Ghana Importers detail pictures


To meet the customers' over-expected pleasure , we've our sturdy group to offer our best overall service which incorporates advertising and marketing, product sales, designing, production, good quality managing, packing, warehousing and logistics for factory wholesale good quality Towing Strap TS10001 to Ghana Importers, The product will supply to all over the world, such as: Sevilla , Bangladesh , Holland , We're always creating new technology to streamline the production, and supply merchandise with competitive prices and high quality! Customer satisfaction is our priority! You can allow us to know your idea to develop unique design for your own model to prevent too much similar parts in the market! We'll offer our best service to satisfy all your needs! Make sure you contact us right away!



  • Getting a 4wd out of the mud where it was bogged, using a snatch strap. But the tension point holding the snatch strap on the bogged vehicle sheared of and embedded itself in the spare trye of the recovery vehicle. Scary stuff. Lucky no one was killed



    Bungee jumping (/ˈbʌndʒiː/; also spelt “Bungy” jumping, which is the usual spelling in New Zealand and several other countries)[1][2] is an activity that involves jumping from a tall structure while connected to a large elastic cord. The tall structure is usually a fixed object, such as a building, bridge or crane; but it is also possible to jump from a movable object, such as a hot-air-balloon or helicopter, that has the ability to hover above the ground. The thrill comes from the free-falling and the rebound.[3] When the person jumps, the cord stretches and the jumper flies upwards again as the cord recoils, and continues to oscillate up and down until all the kinetic energy is dissipated.

    The first modern bungee jumps were made on 1 April 1979 from the 250-foot (76 m) Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol, by David Kirke and Simon Keeling,[4] both members of the Oxford University Dangerous Sports Club.[5] The jumpers were arrested shortly after, but continued with jumps in the US from the Golden Gate Bridge and the Royal Gorge Bridge (this last jump sponsored by and televised on the American programme That’s Incredible), spreading the concept worldwide. By 1982, they were jumping from mobile cranes and hot air balloons.

    Organised commercial bungee jumping began with the New Zealander, A J Hackett, who made his first jump from Auckland’s Greenhithe Bridge in 1986.[6] During the following years, Hackett performed a number of jumps from bridges and other structures (including the Eiffel Tower), building public interest in the sport, and opening the world’s first permanent commercial bungee site, the Kawarau Bridge Bungy at the Kawarau Gorge Suspension Bridge near Queenstown in the South Island of New Zealand.[7] Hackett remains one of the largest commercial operators, with concerns in several countries.

    Several million successful jumps have taken place since 1980. This safety record is attributable to bungee operators rigorously conforming to standards and guidelines governing jumps, such as double checking calculations and fittings for every jump.[citation needed] As with any sport, injuries can still occur (see below), and there have been fatalities. A relatively common mistake in fatality cases is to use a cord that is too long. The cord should be substantially shorter than the height of the jumping platform to allow it room to stretch. When the cord becomes taut and then is stretched, the tension in the cord progressively increases. Initially the tension is less than the jumper’s weight and the jumper continues to accelerate downwards. At some point, the tension equals the jumper’s weight and the acceleration is temporarily zero. With further stretching, the jumper has an increasing upward acceleration and at some point has zero vertical velocity before recoiling upward. See also Potential energy for a discussion of the spring constant and the force required to distort bungee cords and other spring-like objects.

    The Bloukrans River Bridge was the first bridge to be ‘bungee jumped off’ in Africa when Face Adrenalin introduced bungee jumping to the African continent in 1990. Bloukrans Bridge Bungy has been operated commercially by Face Adrenalin since 1997, and is the highest commercial bridge bungy in the world.[8]

    In April 2008 a 37-year-old Durban man, Carl Mosca Dionisio, made bungee jumping history when he jumped off a 30 m (100 ft) tower attached to a bungee cord made entirely of 18,500 condoms.
    The word “bungee” originates from West Country dialect of English language, meaning “Anything thick and squat”, as defined by James Jennings in his book “Observations of Some of the Dialects in The West of England” published 1825. Around 1930, the name became used for a rubber eraser.

    The land diving (Sa: Gol) of Pentecost Island in Vanuatu is an ancient ritual in which young men jump from tall wooden platforms with vines tied to their ankles as a test of their courage and passage into manhood. Unlike in modern bungee-jumping, land-divers intentionally hit the ground, but the vines absorb sufficient force to make the impact non-lethal.[13][14] The land-diving ritual on Pentecost has been claimed as an inspiration by AJ Hackett, prompting calls from the islanders’ representatives for compensation for what they view as the unauthorised appropriation of their cultural property.[15]

    A similar practice, only with a much slower pace for falling, has been practised as the Danza de los Voladores de Papantla or the ‘Papantla flyers’ of central Mexico, a tradition dating back to the days of the Aztecs.

    A tower 4,000 feet (1,200 m) high with a system to drop a “car” suspended by a cable of “best rubber” was proposed for the Chicago World Fair, 1892-1893. The car, seating two hundred people, would be shoved from a platform on the tower and then bounce to a stop.

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bungee_jumping

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